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Opinions in regards to pain tolerance...

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So, let's put it this way, right?

If someone can get in pain easily, even in overwhelming amounts, but has the ability to recover from it very quickly, could you say that the specific individual has a high pain tolerance?
Or, does the individual have to have a certain natural resistance where they just don't feel the pain to begin until it hits a subjective extreme point in order to be considered to have a high pain tolerance?

Just one of those thoughts I've had in mind for a while.

What do you think about it all?
Posted Apr 12, 18 · OP
FatherWh0 a
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Usually the term applies to a situation where a person has a long-term problem that causes a lot of pain, like a back, knee or other body structure problem. When the person is in a lot of pain often their body develops a resistance to feeling pain. Basically two things happen. Their body produces a lot of pain killing endorphins which act as pain killers and their brain becomes numb to pain in general. Eventually any pain, even a new one like a sudden injury, is felt much less than the average person feels.
Posted Apr 13, 18
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I understand what you're trying to say here.

You're applying knowledge from how one develops said resistances, which leads up to the usage of the term, in of itself.

However, applying the same information you've provided here, we can come to the agreement that pain tolerance is subjective, to an extent, but also circumstantial.

The subjective part being what we interpret the term to really incorporate, or in essence, mean.
Now, the circumstances around actually developing said definition is when things get interesting.

While one can develop said resistances through conditioning, can we attribute this trait to one's base "pain tolerance" to be high as a result of it?
Quite possibly, but again. Variable.

The ability to recover from any level of pain very quickly, in of itself, could argued that as a result of this, one could be labeled as having a high pain tolerance, even if they're hypersensitive to conditions of pain.
Some examples can include...
- outbursts when stubbing a toe
- outbursts when getting jabbed by a splinter
- outbursts when getting cut through working with kitchen utensils
...etc.
Now, while said individual is prone, they recover from it really quickly. They can have their few seconds to let out their emotions, but then they come out completely unscathed and treat themselves accordingly, no matter how severe it may be.
Yes, resistance can be amplified thanks to conditioning.

Then, there's this other spectrum.
Now, of course, this could be amplified with the point you were referencing to, which essentially is conditioning to the pain itself.
However, this category of individuals can be considered to have a high pain tolerance because it takes them a lot before they show and visual or audible sign of pain.
However, if pushed to that point when it is noticeable, it takes them a long time to recover.
Now, of course, this could be due to the fact that the pain is more severe, but if the recovery time is abnormally long, could one really label this category as having a high pain tolerance?
Some examples to highlight could be:
- withstanding prolonged tattoo sessions initially, then succumbing to pain and taking a long time to recover from it
- receiving a large hit to a limb that could cause bruising/bleeding/discomfort, but eventually leads to a long recovery
- a wound that's a little more than just a flesh wound, which then can lead to long recovery
...etc.
Yes, resistance can be amplified thanks to conditioning.

Essentially, there's a lot of different categories that could factor into the whole concept, but these two in particular interest me a good bit.
To simplify, there's the group that essentially can get hurt easily, but recovers extremely quickly.
On the other hand, there's the other group that can be very difficult to hurt, but when hurt, it takes an awful long time to recover from it.

These two categories stem down to the fact that they deal with pain and recover from pain differently, but would it be possible to give one group more credit than the other in this scenario?
Or is simply just too variable to really pinpoint?

I understand how there might be a universally agreed way of looking at it, but breaking it down some more...
What kind of person could truly be considered one that has a high pain tolerance?
Posted Apr 13, 18 · OP
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Might be misunderstanding the question but here you go
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~bball
Posted Sun at 06:29 pm
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I understand what you're trying to present here.

I'm just interested in regards to the aforementioned qualities of the person, what kind of person can you give more credit to when it comes to having a high pain tolerance?
What truly constitutes having a pain tolerance?

Father's response touched upon it nicely, but it didn't truly hone in to what I was trying to extract from it all, in regards to what truly constitutes having a high pain tolerance.
Posted Mon at 12:53 am · OP
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